Watch icn

How to Make a Basic BBQ Rub 02:55

Charlie McKenna

"This is a rub that you can use on all your smoked products, smoked meats, pulled pork, ribs, or chicken."

How to Make a Basic BBQ Rub 02:55

Charlie McKenna

"This is a rub that you can use on all your smoked products, smoked meats, pulled pork, ribs, or chicken."

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Add the black pepper to a medium sized bowl. This gives the rub a nice "kick" and brings some heat. 00:11

  2. 2. Add the dark brown sugar. The extra molasses will give the rub depth and sweetness. 00:19

  3. 3. Add in the paprika which provides color and helps smoke adhere to the meat. 00:29

  4. 4. Add the cayenne pepper which lends a finishing heat. 00:45

  5. 5. Add the kosher salt. Do not use iodized salt, as the iodine flavor does not react well with the smoking process. 01:01

  6. 6. Add in the chili powder, onion powder, and garlic powder. 01:27

  7. 7. Mix all the spices together until combined into a uniform mixture. Break up any clumps of brown sugar that may have formed. 01:42

  8. 8. Store the rub in an airtight container or plastic zipper bag for up to 2-3 months. Best used when fresh - the longer the spices are stored, the less potent the flavor will be. 02:02

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Mixing bowl
- Measuring spoons
- Airtight container or plastic bag

Ingredients

- Coarsely ground black pepper (1/4 cup) 
- Dark brown sugar (1/4 cup, packed) 
- Paprika (1/4 cup) 
- Cayenne pepper (1 teaspoon, or to taste) 
- Kosher salt (2 tablespoons) 
- Chili powder (2 tablespoons) 
- Onion powder (1 tablespoon) 
- Garlic powder (1 1/2 tablespoons) 

Chef Notes

This basic barbecue rub is very versatile, and can be applied to a wide multitude of meats. The spices can be varied, just make sure they are of a similar fine grind for even mixing and distribution. 

Although a full cup of dry rub is more than necessary for most recipes, it's an easy thing to make in quantity and keep on hand. Store the dry rub in a sealed container for up to 3 months. Use it to spice up any number of dishes, including grilled salmon, shrimp, chicken and pork.

While it is called a "dry rub," do not literally rub the mixture into the meat. The salt crystals will cut the meat and create areas for juices to escape. Instead, sprinkle the rub across the top of the meat. 

Comments

Sign up to leave a comment

Taught by

Charlie profile pic

Chef Charlie McKenna

Chicago

Chef Charlie McKenna has become the ambassador for down-home Southern food in Chicago. His three restaurants, all named after... read more