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Roasted Pumpkin Grits 04:08

David Slater

Enhancing basic grits with roasted pumpkin purée adds a sweet and earthy boost of flavor.

Roasted Pumpkin Grits 04:08

David Slater

Enhancing basic grits with roasted pumpkin purée adds a sweet and earthy boost of flavor.

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Slice the pumpkin in half vertically. Use a metal spoon to scoop out the seeds from the inside of the pumpkin. Save the seeds to roast. Use them as a garnish or eat them on their own as a snack. 00:23

  2. 2. Cut the pumpkin into quarters. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper and drizzle olive oil across the surface. Sprinkle salt and pepper over the oil. Put the pumpkin pieces skin side up onto the tray. Drizzle additional olive oil over the pumpkin skin. Top with salt and pepper. 01:13

  3. 3. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Roast for 40 to 45 minutes. Remove the pumpkin pieces from the oven when they are soft to the touch and the flesh has caramelized. Use a metal spoon to scoop out the inside meat. Purée in a food processor until smooth and evenly blended. 02:11

  4. 4. Scoop the pumpkin purée into the premade grits. Use a spatula to fold the purée in until it is evenly incorporated. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. 02:51

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Chef’s knife
- Cutting board
- Metal spoon
- Bowl
- Sheet pan
- Parchment paper
- Bowl
- Food processor
- Spatula

Ingredients

- Pie pumpkin (1, whole)
- Olive oil (3 tablespoons)
- Salt and pepper, to taste
- Grits (1 recipe)

Chef Notes

There are many different types of grits. Most supermarkets sell regular or quick-cook grits. The difference in these types of grits is their granulation, as quick grits are ground into a finer texture and yield a quicker cooking time. Stone ground grits are harder to find, but produce a thicker texture and richer flavor. They can be found at specialty food stores, health stores, or at local gristmills.

To learn how to make grits, visit Chef David's "How to Make Grits" tutorial located at the bottom of the page.

Pie pumpkins are specifically grown for cooking and eating. They are smaller and denser than decorative pumpkins, and contain large amounts of calcium, potassium, and vitamin A. They are typically harvested in the early fall, and are sold from September through November in most grocery stores and farmers markets.


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