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An Introduction to Celery Root 04:43

Paul Stearman

Popular in French and Belgian cooking, the fresh and sharp-flavored celery root can be puréed, roasted like a potato, or shaved into a slaw.

An Introduction to Celery Root 04:43

Paul Stearman

Popular in French and Belgian cooking, the fresh and sharp-flavored celery root can be puréed, roasted like a potato, or shaved into a slaw.

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Covered in “gnarly roots,” the celery root must be peeled before it can be used. Using a sharp chef’s knife, start by cutting off the top and the bottom of the celery root. Moving around the celery root cut off the entire hairy, tough brown exterior until only the creamy white interior remains. Make sure all of the skin and roots are removed as they can trap sand that will then get in the food. 02:50

  2. 2. Once the whole celery root is peeled, there are myriad ways to further break it down. It can be diced in varying sizes, including a medium dice as for a stew; and the very small brunoise dice, which would work well in mirepoix. It can also be julienned for a slaw, or just to be eaten raw. 03:28

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Chef’s knife

Ingredients

- Celery root (1)*

*See Chef Notes for further information

Chef Notes

The celery root is a bulb from which roots grow down into the ground and the stalk of the celery grows out of the top. Chef Paul mentions that if you go to the grocery store in Europe looking for celery, you will most likely find the root and the more familiar stalk together.

Celery root is very hardy and can keep in the refrigerator for a week or two. It can be used like a potato in purées, mashes, or stews; it can also be roasted with other root vegetables. Celery root can be used like cabbage in a slaw for a tangy twist.

Chef Paul touts the ease with which celery root picks up the notes in wine. This makes it a perfect accompaniment to veal and beef dishes, particularly those braised in red wine.

Celery root is sometimes called celeriac.

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Chef Paul Stearman

Washington, D.C.

Chef Paul Stearman is a contradiction. The Washington D.C chef has an impressive, classic pedigree including training at L’Ac... read more