Watch icn

Classic Caesar Dressing 04:18

Alex Heath

Mastering this misunderstood classic is easy, and the result is a rich and flavorful dressing.

Classic Caesar Dressing 04:18

Alex Heath

Mastering this misunderstood classic is easy, and the result is a rich and flavorful dressing.

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Add both mustards and the anchovy paste to a food processor. Add the garlic cloves, red wine vinegar, and balsamic vinegar. 00:10

  2. 2. Crack the eggs into a seperate bowl by tapping firmly on the rim of the bowl or the counter. Examine for any shells that may have fallen into the egg. Add the eggs to the food processor. Attach the lid of the food processor and pulse to combine the ingredients. 01:00

  3. 3. Continue blending the ingredients while slowly drizzling oil into the mixture through the top opening of the food processor. As the oil starts to become incorporated, begin pouring a gentle, steady stream until the dressing reaches the desired viscosity. The dressing will become thicker as more oil is used. 01:34

  4. 4. Once the oil has been added, turn off the food processor and remove the lid. Add the Parmesan cheese to the mixture. Season the dressing with salt and pepper. Replace the lid of the food processor and blend to incorporate. 02:53

  5. 5. Turn off the food processor and remove the body from the motor. Use a ladle or a spoon to transfer the dressing to a serving vessel, or directly on top of a salad. Store any dressing that is not immediately being used into an airtight container and refrigerate for up to a day. 03:40

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Food Processor
- Spatula
- Small bowl
- Small ladle or spoon

Ingredients

- Food Processor
- Spatula
- Small bowl
- Small ladle or spoon

Ingredients

- Dijon mustard (3 tablespoons)
- Creole mustard (3 tablespoons)
- Anchovy paste (1 tablespoon)
- Garlic (4 cloves)
- Red wine vinegar (1/4 cup)
- Balsamic vinegar (1/4 cup)
- Eggs (2, whole)
- Oil mixture (1 cup, equal parts olive oil and vegetable oil)
- Parmesan cheese, grated (1 cup)
- Salt to taste
- Pepper to taste

Chef Notes

Creole mustard is a tangy condiment used in New Orleans cuisine, most traditionally on po’boy sandwiches. It typically contains whole grain Dijon mustard, Worcestershire sauce, and hot sauce. It can be purchased from most grocery stores.

Anchovy paste is made from anchovies that have been cured and then puréed. Anchovy paste is less expensive than anchovy filets, and adds a briny savoriness to a variety of dishes without the sometimes-undesirable texture of the filets. The paste has a potent flavor, and should be used in small amounts. One teaspoon of anchovy paste is roughly equivalent to two anchovy filets. This ingredient is sold in tubes, and can be purchased from most grocery and specialty food stores. It should be refrigerated after opening.

Chef Alex uses equal parts vegetable and olive oil for salad dressings to dilute the olive flavor of the olive oil.

An emulsion is a mixture of two liquids that typically would not blend together, such as oil and vinegar.

Parmesan cheese and anchovy paste are both naturally salty ingredients. To avoid over-seasoning the dressing, Chef Alex recommends adding small amounts of salt to begin and increasing the salt content as needed after tasting.

Many people are concerned about eating food containing raw eggs, as there is an inherent risk of salmonella contamination. However, the acidity from the vinegars in this recipe kills off most of the damaging bacteria. If using raw eggs is still a concern, use pasteurized or lightly coddled eggs. Omitting the eggs completely will compromise the texture and the flavor of the dressing.

Comments

Sign up to leave a comment

Taught by

Alex

Chef Alex Heath

New Orleans

Alex Heath is Chef de Cuisine at Ye Olde College Inn, a farm, garden, bakery, and restaurant in New Orleans. At Ye Olde Colle... read more