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Crispy Shrimp Bao with Yuzu Aioli 04:04

Mark O'Leary

Steamed buns provide the perfect contrasting texture for tender, crispy shrimp topped with a creamy citrus sauce.

Crispy Shrimp Bao with Yuzu Aioli 04:04

Mark O'Leary

Steamed buns provide the perfect contrasting texture for tender, crispy shrimp topped with a creamy citrus sauce.

Intermediate
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Fill a deep pot halfway with canola oil. Heat the oil to 350 degrees. Add 1 cup of cornstarch to a mixing bowl. Place the shrimp into the cornstarch, coating each shrimp thoroughly. Shake off any excess cornstarch and gently place the shrimp into the oil. Cook for approximately 90 seconds. 00:25

  2. 2. Remove the shrimp from the oil. They should be fully cooked, crispy, and golden brown. Transfer the shrimp to a towel-lined plate to absorb some of the remaining oil. Season both sides of the shrimp with salt while they’re still hot. 01:28

  3. 3. To assemble the bao, arrange several pieces of shrimp on the inside of each bun. Drizzle yuzu aioli over the shrimp. Garnish the buns with charred jalapeños and micro shiso. Insert a toothpick through each bun, top with sliced scallions, and serve. 01:57

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Deep pot for frying
- Digital thermometer
- Mesh frying basket
- Mixing bowl
- Towel lined plate
- Toothpicks

Ingredients

- Bao buns, steamed (2) *
- Shrimp, peeled and deveined (6, raw)
- Cornstarch (1 cup)
- Yuzu aioli *
- Jalapeños, charred and diced (as garnish)
- Micro shiso (as garnish)
- Scallions, julienned (as garnish)
- Canola oil for frying
- Salt, to taste

* See Chef Notes for more information


Chef Notes

Bao are steamed, filled buns originated in China as early as the third century AD. Their popularity has since spread across East and Southeast Asia, and were brought to the U.S. by immigrants. To learn how to make bao buns, visit Chef Mark’s “How to Make Bao Buns” tutorial located at the bottom of the page.

Yuzu is a citrus fruit originating from Eastern Asia. Its flavor contains notes of lemon, mandarin, and grapefruit. Yuzukoshō is a fermented Japanese seasoning blend made from yuzu rind, dried chili peppers, and salt. Yuzukoshō can be purchased online or from a specialty international market.

To make Chef Mark’s yuzu aioli, blend the desired amount of yuzukoshō with mayonnaise to form a smooth mixture. If yuzukoshō is unavailable, use citrus zest and dried, ground chilies instead. Alternately, season mayonnaise with lime juice, lime zest, and a small amount of hot sauce.

Shiso is a Japanese herb in the mint family, commonly used in fish, pork, noodle, and rice dishes. To learn more about this ingredient, visit Chef Gregory Gourdet’s “A Basic Overview of Shiso” tutorial located at the bottom of the page.


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Mark oleary final

Chef Mark O'Leary

Boston

Mark O'Leary is the executive chef of Shojo Asian Bar & Bistro in Boston, Massachusettes, where he explores the boun... read more