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How to Break Down a Mango 03:13

Pace Webb

Learn the simple methods of breaking down this sweet, tart tropical fruit to add it to a classic fruit platter, cheese plate, or savory salad.

How to Break Down a Mango 03:13

Pace Webb

Learn the simple methods of breaking down this sweet, tart tropical fruit to add it to a classic fruit platter, cheese plate, or savory salad.

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. In order to stabilize it, set the mango onto a work surface on the side of the fruit that is slightly larger. Using a chef's knife, cut a thick chunk of the mango by slicing from the top and sliding the knife down the length of the fruit to the bottom. 00:11

  2. 2. To score it, place the chunk of mango skin side down and, utilizing the tip of the chef’s knife, make lengthwise cuts about 1 inch apart, being sure not to cut all the way to the skin. Turn the mango slice 90 degrees and make perpendicular cuts to form a lattice. 00:22

  3. 3. The chunk of mango should now have some flexibility to it. Press it flat, skin side down on the cutting board, so the squares begin to pop out. With the chef's knife parallel to the cutting board, slide it under the scoring and above the skin to liberate the mango cubes. 00:54

  4. 4. To julienne the mango, slice off the bottom to create a steady base. Place the mango flat side down on the cutting board and use a chef’s knife to peel the skin, starting at the top and sliding the knife down the side of the fruit, being careful to preserve as much of the flesh as possible. 01:39

  5. 5. Locate the pit of the mango. It is fairly large, about 1/2 inch thick and generally runs the length of the mango. On the flat side of the pit, slice away the attached flesh. Place the slice flat side down and cut into 1/8 inch strips, or larger chunks, if desired. 02:13

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Chef’s knife
- Cutting board

Ingredients

- Mango

Chef Notes

Mangoes are a tropical stone fruit with a sweet and tart flavor, similar to an apricot or a peach. They are a climactic fruit, meaning they can be picked when still green and left to ripen on the counter. They come in hundreds of varieties and are commonly used in various types of Asian cooking, particularly Thai.

A slightly underripe mango is much easier to cut as it holds its shape much better than one that is super ripe and juicy. An underripe mango tends to be slightly tangier than it is sweet, as its sugars are not as developed. It has a greener skin with a light yellow flesh. While ripe mangoes are much messier to cut, they are decadently juicy and sweet, and tend to have a slightly redder skin with a deeper orange flesh.

Mangos are said to have myriad health benefits including promoting digestion, helping keep skin clear, and boosting the immune system. Full of vitamins such as C, A, and E, as well as carotenoids, mangos are the perfect blend of healthy eating and decadent indulgence.

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Taught by

Pace

Chef Pace Webb

Los Angeles

Pace Webb is the executive chef at her own boutique, Los Angeles-based catering company, Taste of Pace, and is also a leadi... read more