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How to Properly Temper Eggs 04:06

Jason Fullilove

Tempering gently brings up the temperature of raw eggs to create a thick, velvety emulsion.

How to Properly Temper Eggs 04:06

Jason Fullilove

Tempering gently brings up the temperature of raw eggs to create a thick, velvety emulsion.

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Place a medium mixing bowl containing eggs onto a folded kitchen towel, set on top of a stable work surface. The towel will help to keep the bowl in place. With a whisk, begin to beat the eggs. Once blended, begin to add the warm butter, oil, milk, or cream. Add in small increments, stirring continuously throughout each addition. 00:25

  2. 2. Continue adding the liquid until the mixture begins to take on a thick, custard-like consistency. The mixture is ready for use when, upon dragging the whisk across the bottom of the bowl, the mixture separates enough so that you can see the bottom. 01:46

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Medium mixing bowls (2)
- Whisk
- Kitchen Towel
- Ladle
- Thermometer (optional)

Ingredients

- Eggs (quantity varies according to recipe)
- Warm butter, oil, milk, or cream (varies according to recipe)

Chef Notes

Emulsions are mixtures of liquids that typically do not mix, like oil and water.

If making an ice cream, the tempering process would be adjusted by adding hot milk or cream to eggs, rather than butter. The egg mixture is combined with sugar, lemon juice, vanilla, or other ingredients.

Be careful to add the warm oil slowly to avoid cooking the eggs with a sudden change of temperature. Periodically place a hand on the outside of the mixing bowl to monitor the temperature.

When making clarified butter, slowly bring the temperature up to 145 degrees. When making hollandaise, slowly bring the temperature of the eggs to 140 degrees. When making hollandaise, the mixture is ready for seasoning and use after step two. When making ice cream, the tempered mixture will go back on the stove to thicken further, then chilled and spun in an ice cream maker. For crème brulee, the tempered mixture is poured into a brulee pan and baked in a water bath until solid.

To learn more about making hollandaise, visit Chef Adam Studle’s “How to Make a Classic Hollandaise” tutorial, located at the bottom of the page.

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Taught by

Jason

Chef Jason Fullilove

Los Angeles

Fullilove’s passion for food grew partially from his cultured childhood experience. Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, Full... read more