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Sesame Charred Greens 02:22

Mark O'Leary

Quick high-heat cooking gives traditional Chinese greens a tender texture and rich, smokey flavor.

Sesame Charred Greens 02:22

Mark O'Leary

Quick high-heat cooking gives traditional Chinese greens a tender texture and rich, smokey flavor.

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Heat a sauté pan over high heat until the pan begins to smoke. Add 1 tablespoon of sesame oil. Heat the oil until it is glossy and moves easily around the pan. 00:10

  2. 2. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the greens and toss to coat with the oil. Return the pan to the heat. Use tongs to move the greens around the pan. Cook without stirring until the edges of the greens begin to char. 00:22

  3. 3. Remove the pan from the heat and toss lightly to stir. Return the pan to the heat and add 1 teaspoon of lemon juice and 1/2 teaspoon of soy sauce. Toss again away from the heat to combine. 01:14

  4. 4. Sprinkle sesame seeds over the top of the greens. Serve warm. 01:50

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Sauté pan
- Tongs

Ingredients

- Sesame oil (1 tablespoon)
- Baby bok choy, chopped (1 cup)
- Snow pea tips, chopped (1 cup)
- Lemon juice (1 teaspoon)
- Soy sauce (1/2 teaspoon)
- Sesame seeds (as garnish)


Chef Notes

Bok choy is a type of Chinese cabbage, most commonly prepared by steaming, boiling, or stir-frying.  Baby bok choy has a milder flavor and is more tender than fully matured bok choy. Both versions of this vegetable have a tendency to hold on to dirt, and should be soaked briefly and cleaned thoroughly before cooking.

Snow pea tips are the leaves and shoots of snow pea plants. They are tender, crisp, and slightly sweet. They are commonly prepared by stir frying or wilting into soup. Snow pea tips can be purchased from Asian specialty grocery stores.

Sesame oil is an oil derived from toasted sesame seeds, commonly used in Asian cuisines. Its high smoke point (410 degrees Fahrenheit) makes it a suitable oil for high-heat cooking. Sesame oil has a strong flavor and aroma and should be applied sparingly if it used as a condiment.


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Chef Mark O'Leary

Boston

Mark O'Leary is the executive chef of Shojo Asian Bar & Bistro in Boston, Massachusettes, where he explores the boun... read more