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Simple Texas Pork Rub 02:07

Reid Guess

This sweet and spicy barbecue rub will give any cut of pork rich flavor, and help create a crispy exterior.

Simple Texas Pork Rub 02:07

Reid Guess

This sweet and spicy barbecue rub will give any cut of pork rich flavor, and help create a crispy exterior.

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Add 1 1/2 cups of white sugar, 1 cup of ground coriander, 1/2 cup of ground fennel seed, 1 tablespoon of white pepper, 1 tablespoon of cinnamon, 2 tablespoons of ground ginger, and 1 tablespoon of cayenne pepper to a large mixing bowl. Using your hands or a whisk, combine the spices until they are evenly distributed. Be sure to break up any large clumps. 00:42

  2. 2. To use the rub, apply the mix liberally to all sides of the meat. Allow the meat to rest for four to six hours. For the best results, let the meat rest for a full day. Cook the pork as desired. 01:20

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Large mixing bowl
- Whisk (optional)
- Latex gloves (optional)

Ingredients

- Desired cut of pork meat
- White sugar (1 1/2 cups)
- Coriander, toasted and ground (1 cup)
- Fennel seed, toasted and ground (1/2 cup)
- White pepper, ground (1 tablespoon)
- Cinnamon, ground (1 tablespoon)
- Ginger, ground (2 tablespoons)
- Cayenne pepper (1 tablespoon)

Chef Notes

This versatile rub can be used in a variety of pork recipes. Chef Reid recommends applying the rub to ribs, pork chops, and pulled pork. To learn how to make pulled pork using this rub, visit Chef Reid's "How to Make Pulled Pork" tutorial located at the bottom of the page.

While it is called a "dry rub," do not literally rub the mixture into the meat, as the sugar granules can cut the meat and create areas for juices to escape. Instead, sprinkle the rub across the top of the meat and gently pat the surface.

Coriander refers to the dried seeds of the cilantro plant. It is slightly sweet with a subtle lemony flavor, and is often used in curry and chili recipes. Both coriander seeds and ground coriander can be found at most grocery stories.

Chef Reid toasts the coriander and fennel seed prior to grinding. To learn more about toasting and grinding spices, visit Simon Majumdar’s “How to Toast and Grind Spices” tutorial located at the bottom of the page.

For an alternate barbecue rub recipe, visit Chef Carlie McKenna’s “How to Make a Basic BBQ Rub” tutorial located at the bottom of the page.

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Taught by

Reid

Chef Reid Guess

Austin

Reid Guess runs the kitchen at Austin's "fancy barbecue" joint, Lambert's. At Lambert's, Chef Reid serves classic Texas ... read more