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An Introduction to Parsnips 02:49

Tony Ferrari

This versatile, starchy fall/winter root vegetable can be prepared in a number of ways for deliciously unique side dishes.

An Introduction to Parsnips 02:49

Tony Ferrari

This versatile, starchy fall/winter root vegetable can be prepared in a number of ways for deliciously unique side dishes.

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Clean the parsnip to remove as much dirt as possible. Using a vegetable peeler and working from the top to the tip, peel the skin off the parsnip. 00:48

  2. 2. Using a chef’s knife, remove the root end and the tip of the parsnip; it can be reserved for stock. The parsnip can then be roughly chopped for a soup or a purée; it can also be caramelized in a pan or roasted in an oven. 01:11

  3. 3. Using a mandoline, thinly slice the parsnip. The slices can be used in this form for a salad or garnish, or julienned from the thin slices for a lighter salad or used in a remoulade. 01:35

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Vegetable peeler
- Chef’s knife
- Mandoline*

Ingredients

- Parsnip *

*See Chef Notes for further information


Chef Notes

Parsnips oxidize rapidly when exposed to the air; working quickly in preparing them can help avoid this unpleasant change in appearance. The slices or chunks of parsnip can also be placed in water to avoid oxidization. Parsnips should be stored in the refrigerator if being held for long periods of time.

Parsnips were once used as sweetener in Europe before sugar cane was routinely processed. They can be used as a substitute for potatoes or carrots, depending on the dish.

While a mandolin will produce the thinnest and most even slices, a well-wielded and sharp chef’s knife can also be used for thinly slicing the parsnip.

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Taught by

Tf

Chef Tony Ferrari

San Francisco

Tony Ferrari is the co-founder of San Francisco’s Hillside Supper Club. Working with his culinary partner Chef Jonathan Sut... read more