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An Introduction to Spaghetti Squash 06:21

Jesse Miller

This versatile squash is actually quite easy to work with and has a wonderfully toothsome texture that lends itself well to bold flavors and hearty sauces.

An Introduction to Spaghetti Squash 06:21

Jesse Miller

This versatile squash is actually quite easy to work with and has a wonderfully toothsome texture that lends itself well to bold flavors and hearty sauces.

Easy
Prep Time Cook Time Total Time Serving Size

The Steps

  1. 1. Using a chef’s knife, cut off both ends of the spaghetti squash. Use a slow, sawing motion and take your time, being sure to hold the squash firmly with the other hand. 00:23

  2. 2. Stand the squash on one end and cut through it vertically, separating it into halves. 00:43

  3. 3. Using a large spoon, scoop out all the seeds and the flesh that is attached to them into a medium bowl. Take your time and make sure to remove the softer interior. 01:10

  4. 4. Place the halves of the spaghetti squash face down on a sheet tray (optionally lined with parchment paper) and bake in a 350 to 375 degree Fahrenheit oven for one to two hours, depending on the size of the squash. 02:42

  5. 5. Test the doneness of the squash by pushing gently on the exterior. It should have some give but not so much that the skin can be punctured. 03:36

  6. 6. Using a fork, scrape the strands of the spaghetti squash into a large bowl. If the squash is fresh out of the oven, handle with care. Make sure to use long scrapes to get the most spaghetti-like texture out of the squash. Unlike other squashes, the spaghetti squash can be scraped right down to the skin. 03:54

What You'll Need

Equipment

- Chef’s knife*
- Medium bowl
- Large, sturdy spoon
- Sheet tray
- Parchment paper (optional)
- Large bowl
- Fork
  
Ingredients

- Spaghetti squash (1)*

*See Chef Notes for further information


Chef Notes

Make sure the chef’s knife is very sharp. A dull knife will not only be more difficult to manipulate through the tough skin of the squash but may also lead to an uneven cut that will make standing the squash on end more precarious.

Spaghetti squash is becoming a more commonly used gourd, gaining a popularity that may even surpass butternut or acorn squashes. Unlike other squashes, you want to make sure not to overcook it; think al dente, like with pasta.

It can be used as a sauced substitute for actual spaghetti (it’s lovely with a Bolognese sauce) or can be dressed more simply with just browned butter and herbs.

The seeds of the spaghetti squash, like those of its cousin the pumpkin, can be toasted and salted for a snack or garnish. However, Chef Jesse warns that they are more difficult to work with (including requiring peeling the seeds), but “in the end they are quite delicious.” For more information, please visit Chef Jesse’s “Spaghetti Squash Alfredo with Brown Butter” tutorial.

To cook the spaghetti squash, it can also be steamed. Prepare the squash as you would for roasting. Fill a large saucepan halfway up with water and, once the water is at a good rolling boil, insert a steamer basket with the squash halves face down in it. Steam for 20 minutes, checking frequently to make sure the squash doesn’t overcook.


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Taught by

Jesse

Chef Jesse Miller

Washington D.C.

Jesse Miller is the Executive Chef at Washington D. C’s Bar Pilar and its sister establishment, Saint-Ex. He got his st... read more